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in boston. no american official knew where he was. it's hard to prove negatives but we have 6000 documents from the bin laden compound that have been translated. if there's there is a smoking gun, proving official pakistani passivity operations are not so good that we would not pointed out publicly at this point. >> the difference between diplomats and journalists is that journalists say more than they know and diplomats no morew more than they say. but we are in harmony on this one. [laughter] there is no evidence i have seen that there was high-level complicity or knowledge about him being in abbottabad. this led to the problem that if you don't know you can be a accused of and confidence in this was a domestic issue but that is a different question than we are talking about. there is to my knowledge no evidence that they knew that he was there during that time. >> one quick follow up, al qaeda tried to kill general musharraf. al qaeda was at war with the pakistani state and the pakistani state is quite helpful with the operational commander of 9/11. we have had pakistani help reticular
of world boston. as we head into the pam assessing the aftermath of the arab spring, allow me to thank todd, president and ceo of the world affairs councils of america, his crack staff, national council chair, laurie murray, and our many sponsors for this significantly stimulating conference thus far. [applause] like america, i am a wash in debt. it's time to make good on those obligations to each here on the panel who i'm honored to present. i had the pleasure of hearing at dozens of universities in the boston area. i'm owing you a way overdue invitation to the council downtown. professor is a senior fellow at the saban center at brookings institution, a distinguished former and current adviser to government agencies, u.s. leaders, and diplomats, and he's a prolific and best-selling author. i'll quote from the top of the website at the university of maryland where he is the professor of peace and development. i have always believed that good scholarship can be relevant and consequential for public policy. it is possible to effect public policy without being an advocate, to be passionate ab
use on the fbi's most wanted list. is responsible for 20 murders in boston. no american official knew what he was. there's no evidence to suggest that. it's hard to prove negligence but with 6000 doctors from the bin laden compound that has been transited if it was a smoking gun i would be interested in ambassador munter's observation. if there was a smoking gun, our observation on oscar we would not a pointed it out publicly at this point. >> you know, the difference between diplomats and journalists is that journalists say more than they know and diplomats no more than they say. [laughter] but we are in harmony on this one. [laughter] >> know, there is now evidence that i've seen that there was high level complicity or knowledge about him being in abbottabad. this led to the problem that if you don't know, you can be accused of incompetence and this was a domestic issue for the pakistan military and intelligence but that's a different question than we're talking about. there is to my knowledge no evidence a new he was there during the time. >> al qaeda tried to kill general musharra
correspond to cities like new york, atlanta, dallas, boston, los angeles, and they indicate how in the early 1990's, late 1980's, there was a very significant incrse inhe homicide rates. we have homicide rates all the way up to 60, 40, something like that. mexico's current homicide rate you can see on this tight. >> rose: 100,000. >> the rate is at 24 and it has raised significantly over the last few years. what we have confronted is a increase in homicide rates not only in mexico but in all the hemisphere over the last few years. in the decade between 2000 and 2010 the homicide rate, the averaghomide re in all of the americas increased by 60%. so what we're doing in mexico is a fight for security. we are improving the rule of law. we are confronting these cartels, we're trying to bring them down, bring them to justice. we are transforming institutions devoted to the rule of law. and we are also going to the most vulnerable area of society to try to reconstruct the social fabric. of course we want to have much better results. >> rose: are you succeeding. >> i think we would want to have mu
areas across northeast pretty dry, boston, you'll continue to see snowflakes. but the worst of it winding down. >> steve: all right. hey, maria, here is a big question: brian and i want to know whether or not we should put our snow tires on the car. >> brian: right. or the chains. >> gretchen: i guess i just won't drive. >> winter is around the corner, right? so you got to winterize your car. >> steve: there you go. all season steel belted radials. >> not because of this storm, though. >> steve: okay. >> gretchen: thanks. the funny thing is, when i live around the country and i still had minnesota license plates when i lived in dallas, people would follow me thinking that i knew what the heck i was doing. >> brian: and? >> gretchen: driving down the road. i'd feel like, hey, i haven't lived there full time since i was 17. don't follow me. i'm not necessarily good in the snow anymore. >> brian: they probably thought they were talking to fran tarkenton. >> gretchen: let's do headlines. the country's largist organic peanut processor shut down. this comes after a salmonella out
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)